How to Crochet a Necklace with Ribbon Yarn

Cyndee Kromminga
Crocheted Ribbon Necklace

Jewelry is a great way to perk up your wardrobe, and it doesn't have to be with silver, gold, or precious gems. At least not the real ones. Use ribbon yarn to crochet a necklace. Ribbon yarn necklaces are easy to make, even if you have no crochet experience, as the only stitch involved is the basic chain.

Crochet Ribbon Necklace

Crochet this simple 5-strand necklace using beautiful ribbon yarn. Each strand features beads that are crocheted in as you go. Along with the glitter of the beads, the shimmer of the ribbon fibers create a luxurious accessory. Download and print the simple instructions found below. Use these tips for printing your PDF pattern.

Tips and Customizing

One thing to keep in mind when crocheting with ribbon yarn is that it tends to spin and twist when you are working with it. While this takes a bit of getting used to, the resulting look of the chains will give your necklace strands an interesting, puffy look. For more troubleshooting or customizing ideas, check out the following list for inspiration.

  • Aside from the adjustable closure, you can lengthen and shorten your necklace by simply changing the length of your chain strands and/or tails.
  • To make a necklace with strands of graduating lengths, make each strand 1"-2" longer than the previous one.
  • Bigger or smaller hooks will change the size of your chain stitches.
  • If you are having trouble threading beads onto your ribbon yarn, thread them onto crochet thread in a coordinating color. Crochet beaded strands with the thread and add them to your ribbon strands when constructing your necklace.
  • A large-eyed needle can also be used for threading the yarn through the beads. If a needle isn't available, apply a small dot of craft glue to the end of the yarn and twist the tip into a point. Allow the glue to dry and use the tip as a needle. Trim off the glued tip when done.
  • For a fuller necklace, add additional strands and/or bulkier ribbon yarn.

Ribbon Yarn and Sources

"Ladder" and "trellis" are common terms used for ribbon yarn that features small panels suspended between rows of coordinating thread. It is a novelty yarn that is made to look and feel like a gossamer craft ribbon and can be made from a variety of fibers. Some ribbon yarns are one color, while others are made with multiple coordinating colors. You can find ribbon yarns that have alternate matte and shiny bands as well as yarn with a mesh-like texture interspersed with the solid woven areas.

Ribbon yarn is usually available in relatively small quantities and because it is a novelty yarn, it is generally more expensive than other types of yarn used for crocheting or knitting. Ribbon yarn can be found at craft stores and specialty yarn stores. The following are an abundance of online sources for your ribbon yarn choices. Gauges may or may not be given for these yarns, but when used for crochet ribbon necklaces, gauge is not important, and overall construction can easily be altered.

  • Manga Moon has Silk Ribbon and Cotton Ribbon yarn that is on the high end with prices between $10 and $13 for approximately 75 yards. Don't let that stop you from considering the amazing texture of each of these choices.
  • Love Knitting offers Crystal Palace-Party ribbon yarn in several silky and shiny colors for around $6. These 87 yard balls are classified as bulky/chunky so changing bead sizes will be necessary for stringing and the adjustable closure.
  • While the Premier City Life Ladder Yarn available at Jo-Ann's may not have more than six color choices, the fantastic price at $6 for 140 yards is well worth crocheting into eye-catching necklace strands.
  • Ranging between $5 and $7 per spool, Creative Fiber Arts has Ice, Flame, Berlini Metallic and Magic ladder yarn in numerous colors. Each spool yields a whopping 150-200 yards.
  • Paradise Fibers offers Euro Yarns-Athena yarn in nine colors at less than 100 yards for $4, but if your would like to try something a little different and a lot "greener," check out their Recycled Sari Ribbon. Made by women's development groups in Nepal, this imperfect but luscious ribbon yarn is 25 yards long at only $7.50. Every necklace you make will be one-of-a-kind.

Money-Making Opportunity

While the initial cost of ribbon yarn may give you sticker-shock, necklaces made from the yarn can easily recoup your expense and provide a profit if you decide to sell them. Create a display with a variety of necklaces for craft show events, consider opening a store on Etsy, or show them off at work and be astounded at the orders you will receive.

How to Crochet a Necklace with Ribbon Yarn