3 Fun Crafts to Do With Wine Bottles

Cyndee Kromminga
Wine Bottle Crafts

Before you toss your empty wine bottle into the trash or recycle bin, consider its potential for a great do-it-yourself craft. Transform those empties into one of these fun and easy projects to decorate your home.

Shabby Chic Bottle Lamp

While it looks like you need electrical expertise for this project, you really don't. The soft lighting of Christmas lights and the texture of lace make this lamp a perfect choice as a nightlight in a dark hall or front entryway.

Shabby Chic Bottle Lamp

Things You Will Need:

  • Wine bottle
  • Stretch lace fabric, 16" square
  • Straight pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread for the machine that matches your lace
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Drill and 1/2" diamond bit
  • Masking tape
  • Spray bottle with water
  • 35 clear, mini Christmas lights with white cord
  • Desk light lamp shade with uno fitter
  • Craft glue

Note: The shade used for this project is a bell shade with a 4" top, 11'' bottom and 8 1/2" height. Other shade styles and sizes can be used.

What to Do:

  1. Remove the labels from an empty wine bottle.
  2. Drill a hole one inch from the bottom of the bottle. (If you've never drilled a hole in a wine bottle, follow the detailed instructions in this Snowy Wine Bottle Light project.)
  3. Wrap a 16" square of stretchable lace fabric around the wine bottle, with excess fabric extending past the top and bottom edges. If your fabric has a right and wrong side, wrap with the wrong side facing out. Stretch and pin a seam down one side of the bottle (from top to bottom), tightly fitting the lace to the bottle shape.
  4. Slide the pinned lace up and off the bottle. Sew the pinned seam. Cut the fabric approximately 1/4" outside the stitched seam. You now have a lace sock for your bottle.
    Make a bottle sock.
    Make a bottle sock.
  5. Turn the sock right side out and slip it on the bottle. Cut the excess fabric at the top and bottom, one inch from the bottle.
  6. Fold the bottom edge under to form a hem and using craft glue, secure the hem to the bottle. Apply craft glue inside the rim of the bottle. Push the excess at the top inside the neck.
  7. Using the point of a pair of scissors, poke a hole in the lace over the drilled hole in the bottle.
  8. Insert the end of the string of lights into the hole. Thread the lights into the bottle. If your lights have a plug, leave this outside the bottle with enough cord to reach an outlet. If they are battery operated, leave the end outside the bottle so you can turn them on and off.
    Insert lights.
    Insert lights.
  9. Place an 8 1/2" tall bell lamp shade with an uno fitting over the neck of the bottle. (An uno fitting is a ring that usually fits over the light bulb socket before the light bulb is attached. In this case you are fitting it over the bottle neck and not adding a light bulb.) Your lamp is now ready to display!
    Place the uno fitting over the neck.
    Place the uno fitting over the neck.

Liquid Wine Bottle Dispenser

Vinegars, oils or even dish soap do not look very pretty in their store-bought packaging. Spruce them up by putting them in recycled wine bottles with decorative etching and a pourer spout.

Liquid Wine Bottle Dispenser

Things You Will Need:

Note: A clear or lightly tinted bottle will provide the best results for etching.

What to Do:

  1. Remove the labels from an empty wine bottle and clean the bottle thoroughly.
  2. Apply a reusable etching stencil on the side of the bottle. Firmly press down all the cut edges using a craft stick. Do not use your fingers as they will transfer oils to the glass.
  3. Apply masking tape strips around the stencil to further protect the surface you do not want etched.
  4. Apply a thick layer of etching cream to the stencil design using a cheap artist brush. Make sure the entire design has been covered. Wait five minutes for the cream to work.
    Apply stencil and etching cream.
    Apply stencil and etching cream.
  5. Carefully wipe the cream off with a paper towel. Immediately place under running water and continue to rinse off the cream. Peel off the stencil and dry the bottle.
    Etched Image
    Etched and cleaned image.
  6. Fill the bottle with a liquid of your choice. Insert the bottle pourer.

Altered Bottle Serving Stand

Elevate your edible offerings on a serving stand made from an empty wine bottle and a tart pan. It's great for a buffet or a table where space is scarce.

Altered Bottle Serving Stand

Things You Will Need:

  • Off-white craft paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Old book pages
  • Mod Podge
  • Sponge brush
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Burlap scrap
  • 3" wide, flat lace trim, 1/3 yard
  • Craft glue
  • Hot glue gun
  • Silk flower
  • Polymer clay
  • 11" tart pan
  • Drill and 1 1/2" bit
  • Jute
  • Wine cork

Note: A metal pie pan, tray or cake pan can be substituted for the tart pan.

What to Do:

  1. Remove the label from an empty wine bottle.
  2. Paint the top inch of the bottle's neck using off-white craft paint.
  3. Tear five or six old book pages into approximately two-inch squares. The book pages used for this project were from an old dictionary, but you can use any old book you like.
  4. Apply Mod Podge (MP) to a small section of the bottle using a sponge brush. Apply MP to one side of a page square. Place the square on the prepared section of the bottle. Apply more MP over the square. Repeat with additional squares, overlapping the edges, until the entire bottle is covered. Do not cover over the painted top of the neck. Allow to dry completely.
    Decoupage the bottle.
    Decoupage the bottle.
  5. Cut a 4" wide by 11" long strip of burlap. Pull three strings from each long edge to fray. Cut an 11" long strip of 3" wide lace trim. Center and glue the lace over the burlap. Wrap the burlap and lace strip around the bottle's "waist." Using hot glue, attach the strip to the bottle. Turn the bottle with the seam in the back. Hot glue a silk flower to the center front of the strip. Note: The 11" measurement fits the standard 750 ML bottle used in this project with a slight overlap. Measure your bottle before cutting your length to determine if you need to lengthen or shorten the strip.
  6. Apply craft glue over the painted section at the top of the neck. Wrap coils of jute twine over the glue. Place the wine cork back into the bottle.
    Embellish the bottle.
    Embellish the bottle.
  7. Drill a hole in the center of a metal tart pan using a 1 1/2" paddle bit. Insert the neck of the bottle through the hole and slide the pan down the neck.
  8. Roll a 2" ball of polymer clay into a 1/2" thick snake. Wrap the snake around the bottle's neck below the pan. Remove the pan. Cut off the excess snake and press the ends together. Slide the clay ring off the bottle. Bake according to the manufacturer's directions on the clay package. Allow the ring to cool. Paint the ring using off-white craft glue.
    Make a clay ring.
    Make a clay ring.
  9. Slide the ring back onto the bottle. Slightly lift the ring and in its place apply craft glue around the neck. Slide the ring down over the glue. Apply craft glue around the top surface of the ring. Slide the tart pan back down the neck and press firmly over the ring. Allow the glue to dry.

Gathering Your Supplies

After your friends and family see what you have created with wine bottles you will want to make more for gifts. Even though saving your own empties may not be a hardship, you may need help. Ask local bars or restaurants if they wouldn't mind saving their bottles for you.

3 Fun Crafts to Do With Wine Bottles